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Contacts and Frequently Asked Questions                                                      

443-250-7235 or Email tripple007@aol.com        

Sugar Glider Warnings-Debunking Sugar Glider Mill Breeder Lies(Pocket Pets ): YouTube Links (Courtesy of: LuckyGlider) We are just so sick of the twisted lies mill breeders tell and the equally twisted lies that (would you believe) an actual vet tells that we are compelled to publish a series of debunking videos on YouTube. The purpose of these videos is two-fold:

1. To establish that there are in fact a regular set of “Myths” or “Lies” told by mill breeders, and that apparently healthcare professionals can be duped into believing some of them and parroting what the greedy, soul-less mill breeders say.

2. To warn people about the truth of sugar gliders as pets so they don’t buy or adopt them based on false information. If you buy or adopt sugar gliders based on false information, it only ends up hurting the animal or killing it.

Lucky Glider Rescue Helpful advise  (See the following Links for all the answers )  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9DmV_pbAFQ

 *Introduction -

Lie 1-  Sugar Gliders are Bears ?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-4ODjP2yEM

Lie 2- Gliders are good Impulse purchases
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6ghep3GAi8

Lie 3-Do Sugar Gliders and Dogs get along?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjE7gxhbRb0

Lie 4-Sugar glider Diet is simple?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJsK_J41h4Q

Lie 5- Sugar Glider can Potty Train?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PrONtvA3tU

Lie 6- Sugar Gliders Don’t bite?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3c9wcW5ovs

Lie 7- Can Sugar Glider be alone?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l46MBVFT-ks

Lie 8- No rescue Centers?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6b7v_YV4pU

Lie 9- Fake Site exist?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OLvK35IwCY

Lie 10-Suagr Gliders NEED Heat Rocks?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jClnYl7Q-0                              

  Come See the Babies In Action! If you choose a Sugar glider joey, we require a non-refundable 1/3 of the Amount as deposit to hold the joey until it is old enough to leave at 8 weeks out of pouch.  All prospective owners are invited and encouraged to come visit with and hold their joeys to allow them to become familiar with their prospective owners.  We believe it enhances the bonding process. 

Finding a Good Breeder
So you want to buy a Sugar glider? Well the first thing you should do is find a good reputable breeder...    Having a USDA license does NOT mean they are a good breeder.
Ask for and check references. Don't be shy!   Ask for testimonials or references?

How long have they have been in the sugar glider business?

What is their policy if you find the sugar glider is mean and not sweet as promised in their advertising? 

How much knowledge do they have about sugar gliders? 

Does your glider come with a health guarantee? 



What are some signs of a good breeder?
A good breeder will let you see their "facilities" and the parents of the glider you are wanting. Check to see their facility is clean, that the cages are of sufficient size and that the gliders have toys and wheels in their cages.  the breeder Should ask a lot of questions of you also.  They will want to know why you have chosen a glider and If you realize the level of commitment that goes into the care of a glider?   
What am I getting with the purchase of my gliders? 

breeders providing information on the care, feeding and habitat? 

Are they providing sample food or diets for you to begin a healthy regiment? 

they provide references, such as books, booklets, videos, DVD of continual care? 

Is the breeder helpful with all my concerns?  

Ask them about diet. What they feed the parents and what the joeys will be weaned onto. A good breeder will have their diet on  an approved Diet .  

Ask them at what age they separate the joeys from the parents. (they should be no younger than 8 weeks out of pouch before being separated from the parents)
Ask them how they determine the age of the joeys, If it's from their actual birth date or from their out of pouch date.

Ask them about after sale support.

Ask them to see their vet records for the parents, joeys or other gliders and for a vet reference.

Ask if the gliders are related and if the breeder has a family tree on them. You want to avoid inbred gliders as they could have genetic medical issues.

Look at the glider itself. There fur should be fluffy and soft/silky. They should be bright eyed and alert. They should not be hand shy or afraid but friendly and social. (both the parents and the joeys).

A good breeder should be comfortable with questions. Tons of questions - which you should be asking. Any annoyance or hesitation on the breeder's part is cause for question. A good breeder will want the reassurance their glider(s) are going to the perfect home. If the breeder seems like they would sell to anyone with money, be cautious.

Also, it's very important to ask WHERE they got their gliders. A good breeder will start spouting off where they got each, lines they're from, etc. If they hesitate or say they got them in the paper or from just some person, you can't be sure there's not any inbreeding/defects in the line, plus it's a HUGE sign of an irresponsible breeder.

Any rescuer or breeder should be as interested in you as you are in them

So don't be afraid to ask questions- lots of them- because a good breeder will not only welcome the questions, but reciprocate with many of their own.

(empty)

Leucistic Sugar Gliders Baby B Sleeping With Tasmania

If you have placed a deposit on a joey or joeys (1/3 non-refundable), you may make arrangements to come visit and spend time with your new baby to begin the bonding process - highly suggested.

____________________________________________________________________

Sugar glider Joey for sale Sugar Gliders Do thumb suck if any one asks !!!!

Frequently Asked Questions  

Do I Need a Licence to have a Sugar Glider?                                               It is not necessary in most states to have any type of permit or license to have a sugar glider as a pet. However I have heard of places wear there may be restrictions so check out any city ordinances or state laws to be sure. To the best of my knowledge having a Sugar Glider is not legal in California, Georgia or Massachusetts. Further,  Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin seam to have at least some area (city or county) that does not allow ownership or sale of  Gliders.It is necessary to have a Federal United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)  license from the animal care department in order to breed, sell, or broker gliders . To find out more visit the USDA animal care website or contact your Regional USDA AC office.


How Important is it to get more than one glider ? This depends almost entirely on how much time your (and your family/household members) will be spending with the Sugar Glider and the emotional make up of your glider. Gliders are social animals and need interaction or they can grow lonely and get depressed and even sick. People that spend an hour or more a day interacting with a single glider out side of the cage normally have wonderful healthy and happy single gliders. Some gliders do fine with just a half an hour a day but more is always better. If you can't dedicate at least that much time to your glider you may want to think about getting two so they can interact with each other. There is only one disadvantage I know if in getting a two gliders and that is sometimes they may be more likely to bond to each other than to you. In my favorite pair that I have now I found that the boy (Tasmania) bonded more with me and the girl (Victoria)  .

For those that want a pair of gliders two females or a pair work best (see question on legally breeding and selling gliders if you get a pair). If you want a pair but no babies you can neuter males. Two male gliders normally will be fine also (i have never had a problem but a few others have suggested they may fight). If you have a large group you should make sure you have two or three females for each male.

WHEEEE!!         I am Flying !!!

Do You Ship Your Gliders ?
It is NOT legal to ship mammals via US Mail, FedEx, or UPS. The only safe and legal way to ship them is via airline carrier.

The animal(s) and shipping costs must be paid in full 1 week prior to shipping excluding holidays. Shipping costs usually run between $160.00-$250.00 including flight, health certificate (if required or requested), crate, heat pack (if needed), and shipping pouch. We almost always use Continental Airlines, as we feel they are the safest, easiest, and most dedicated airline to shipping pets safely and affordably. If we have to use a different airline, prices may vary. Some airlines can be quite a bit more expensive than Continental Airlines, but may need to be used if Continental Airlines does not ship to the desired location. Example, Delta's flights start around $250.00, and require a health certificate. Continental on the other hand have their flights start around $185.00, and only require a health certificate for sugar gliders if you are using "declared value". Which we do recommend, as we are not responsible for what happens during flight. Please contact us for a price quote for shipping. Upon receiving payment in full we will need discuss the best days to schedule a flight. We usually use Continental Airlines for our shipping carrier. If you purchased a health certificate, your glider must be taken to the vet within 10 days of the flight in order to qualify for the "declared value" insurance and state laws requiring a health certificate to enter the state. You will receive an e-mail with all important shipping information. If you don't confirm the flight arrangements, I will not ship the glider. If you can not make a scheduled flight, please let me know as soon as possible.    

We do the best we can to ensure that shipping is as stress free as possible. We try to schedule early flights during an animals natural sleeping hours. The night before we ship, we give them extra play time to ensure they are tired, and ready to sleep. Our animals are shipped in a cat sized carrier that has been airline approved. Sugar gliders will have an internal "critter keeper" or similar carrier to be sure they are safe, and there is no chance of escape during the flight. Sometimes we will use a Transonic shipping crate (see style two). Sugar gliders will be inside a pouch within the crate with paper securing the pouch from being flopped around during shipping. Sugar Gliderwill be in nesting pouch for hiding. A heat pack will be placed in the crate if needed. If it is too cold or too hot, we may need to postpone shipping. We provide, apples, grapes, or oranges during shipping to provide hydration and nutrition.

Animals are usually picked up in the cargo department of Continental Airlines. Some airports have a special live animal department, please call your airport to confirm where you will pick up your sugar glider in advance. This will make the entire day go so much more smoothly for everyone involved. You will need to bring a photo ID when picking up your sugar glider. We will be taking out insurance for your baby should anything happen in flight IF you purchased a health certificate. PLEASE check to make sure the glider is ok BEFORE leaving the Continental Airlines office. (a quick Peek should do). We ask that you call us upon your arrival home to ease our mind that the glider(s) made to their new home safely.

Continental Cargo Phone Number: 1-800-421-2456 
Delta's "Pets First": 1-888-SEND-PET 1-888-736-3738

We CAN NOT ship an animal if the temperature is above 85 or below 45 anywhere along the route. The cabin on the plains are temperature controlled but the time the animals are being loaded,  unloaded or moved from one plain to another there is no protection.


Is there Diet expensive, and complicated ?                                                            While it was true TEN YEARS AGO that Sugar Gliders required a diet consisting of special mixtures of insects and other “live” foods - in the last several years TREMENDOUS advances in nutritional science have resulted in a handful of very SAFE and EFFECTIVE commercial “pelleted” foods and powdered vitamin supplements which in fact greatly EXCEED the nutritional values of the older, outdated diets.  These advanced, scientifically-balanced diets have been developed and approved by LICENSED Doctors of Veterinary Medicine who specialize in Sugar Glider care – and are proven to be both safe and effective.

When fed the correct diet of: 1) Veterinarian-approved pelleted food, 2) fresh fruits & vegetables, and 3) a Veterinarian-approved, calcium-based multivitamin supplement, it should only cost an average of less than $10 per month to feed a single animal.  Any reputable, Federally-Licensed USDA Breeder will be able to provide you with a written dietary plan that is both simple for you – and healthy for your Gliders.

Yes Its Victorias Belly with Two Babies -Both Babies in Pouch   - way to Young to Sell - They should be about 8 weeks old  

What is the best age to purchase a Sugar Glider?
That really depends on you and what you’re looking for!  Any age sugar glider can and will bond to a new owner.  Our joeys are weaned from their mommies at 8-10 weeks out of pouch.  We do not sell our babies any younger than 8 weeks.  This is typically when they are adopted by their new families.  Sometimes, we do have some older joeys.. 3-5 months old.  Most all joeys will go through a juvenile stage that usually last about a month.  In this stage, the sugar seems moody and defiant.  In most cases, the sugar can be nippy.  This stage usually happens anywhere from 3 to 6 months out of pouch.  Most people seem to enjoy getting their new pet as small as possible because they are just so cute when they are so tiny!  So it seems that most people prefer to get them younger.

***BEWARE OF BREEDERS SELLING younger JOEYS***
***YOUNGER THAN 8 WEEKS OUT OF POUCH***
***OR “PEANUT” JOEYS*****

Yes, yes and yes.. these joeys are OH so CUTE!!!!  This is because they are so tiny and have been PULLED away from their moms and dads.  Some breeders do this in order to produce more frequent breedings by the parents to make more money.  Unfortunately, this is very detrimental to that cute little baby that has been taken from its parents WAAYYYYY too early.  Baby sugar gliders rely on their mom and dad to care for them and keep them alive for at least 6 weeks.  At 6 weeks out of pouch, the baby sugar glider will be venturing out at night to the food dish and sampling the foods that their parents are eating.  Even though they are eating a little bit on their own, they are still nursing on their mom and getting the nutrition that is so necessary for their survival at such a young age.  Mom and dad sugar gliders also assist baby sugars in going to the bathroom.  We know of TOO MANY instances where a “peanut” joey was adopted and died within a few weeks because of lack of proper nutrition and constipation.  Most baby sugars are not able to go potty without mom and dad stimulating them to do so.  Any sugar younger than 8 weeks out of moms pouch is simply too young.  With your new pet, make sure it is old enough to be away from mom and dad.  It will save you a lot of money for vet care trying to help this wee one survive simply because it was taken away from its parents too early.  Plus, it’s so sad to watch a little one get so sick and possibly die when if the breeder would have waited till it was old enough, all would be fine.  No younger than 8 weeks.  That is the age babies are able to potty on their own, and are no longer nursing on their mommies. 

SO… Short answer to this question?  No matter what anyone tells you… do not risk purchasing a sugar that is any younger than 8 weeks oop.  Steer clear of a breeder that is willing to sell sugars younger than 8 weeks out of pouch.  Also be very wary of breeders claiming to have “peanut” sugar gliders for sale.  99% of the time, a “peanut” sugar is just a baby that has been taken from its parents too early.


Do Sugar Gliders bite?
Anything that has teeth CAN bite.  Each of our sweet little Sugar Gliders have 40 of them!  With that said, the more comforting answer would be this…Sugar Gliders usually only nip or bite when they are afraid of the person holding them.  As babies their bite is usually no more than a hard pinch that almost never results in broken skin.  When they are convinced that you are not going to hurt them, they calm down and usually will not bite.  We do our best to make sure the babies are handled a lot so they are very accustomed to human touch and won’t feel the need to bite out of fear.  We begin holding and kissing and loving on all our joeys from the first day out of mommies pouch and continue to do so until they go to their new homes.  We have a great reputation for raising very healthy and sweet babies.  There are some that do not take to people very easily even when they ARE handled a lot.  Still, even these fussy sugars will bond to you and not bite after a period of persistent work.  Any age sugar glider can be trained to trust you and NOT BITE.

joey glider OOPThis is what a Just Out Of Pouch Baby looks Like 1 day old (This is Baby C)- NEVER -NEVER PULL A BABY OFF NIPPLE , They will come off all by themselves in there own time ...Victoria trusted me to watch her baby so she could go exercise.

Do Sugar Gliders make good pets?
Yes, by all means, a Sugar Glider is uniquely suited to captivity.  They are very social, and will totally bond to the person who gives them good care and treats them well.  Sugar Gliders are not for small children who cannot control themselves and want to squeeze them too tight, or treat them too rough, but they are wonderful pets for older children and adults.

How long do Sugar Gliders live?
A Sugar Gliders life span depends on where it lives.  If the Sugar lives in captivity, then its life span is 12-15 years, if it’s taken care of properly.  In the wild, Sugar Gliders don’t live nearly as long, maybe 5-7 years.  Humans, birds of prey, and arboreal snakes are Gliders natural enemies in the wild, so they don’t survive nearly as long as in captivity.
                                                                                                                  

I have heard Sugar Gliders are Messy and have a Odor ?                            Thats  Just a MYTH:  “Sugar Gliders constantly mark their territory and are very smelly animals much like a ferret or skunk…”  “Their cage needs to be constantly cleaned…”  “ Poo and pee on your clothes, skin, hair, and furniture is a constant with these animals…” REALITY:  This myth directly relates back to the earlier misinformation that you somehow HAVE to feed your Gliders “live” foods; like worms, crickets, grasshoppers - and even baby mice - in order for them to be healthy.  While it is possible that Sugar Gliders can develop an odor similar to – but not as strong as – a ferret; the primary cause of this odor is feeding them an old, outdated diet containing LIVE foods and meat-based proteins.

The fact is that several years ago nutritional science greatly simplified the entire process of caring for Sugar Gliders (in many ways) with the development of scientifically-balanced pellet food diets.  For example, some of the more-advanced pelleted foods even contain proprietary ingredients specifically-designed to prohibit odors; and Sugar Gliders who are fed this diet on a daily basis will usually have almost NO discernable smell. 

While it is true that Sugar Gliders technically cannot be “potty-trained”, they are instinctively very clean little animals who never require bathing of any kind.  Their bathroom habits are very predictable, and in many ways they are similar to humans.  For example, when we wake up from a long nap, usually the first thing we want to do is go to the bathroom – and Sugar Gliders are no different.  Therefore, by 1) learning their potty habits, and 2) thoroughly “de-pooping/peeing” them before letting them run around -  “accidents” typically become few and far between in a relatively short period of time.  Most reputable breeders will provide you with detailed instructions on exactly how to do this                                                                                                                                          

What things should you consider before buying a Sugar?
A Sugar Glider can live up to 15 years in captivity.  Can you take responsibility for it for that long?
Can you provide a reasonably large cage?  The cage should be no smaller than 24x24x36 large the better.
Do you have time to keep the cage clean?
Do you have time to clean and cut fresh fruits and veggies for your Sugar Glider every day?
Since Sugars are very social animals, do you have enough time to play with it consistently?  Do you have enough money to buy two Gliders to keep each other company?
If children are caring for it, do you have the time to supervise and help in handling and caring for it?
Do you have someone to care for your pet if you are gone for more than 24 hours or can you take your Sugar with you on trips?
Is there a veterinarian in your area that cares for exotic pets?  Do you have the money if it needs medical attention?
Are there other pets in your house that will not adapt to living with a Sugar Glider?
Is there anyone in your household that is allergic to animal fur?
 
How do I bond with my Sugar Glider?
When bonding with your Sugar Glider, there is no substitute for a lot of hands on time.  By that, we mean actually holding your glider in your hands and petting it and rubbing it, getting it used to you and learning that you are not to be feared.  Gliders in a group will all huddle together and each will try to climb under the pile.  There is a constant movement going on in the group.  They will all fall asleep but every so often, one will stir and try to get under the neighbor to get warmer.  This tight body contact and movement is what you want to imitate while holding them.  Sugar Gliders do not respond well to a timid person who is actually afraid to touch them, or is afraid that they will hurt the Glider.  They sense this immediately, and feel insecure with that person.  Hold it confidently in your hands.  Rub it with your hands firmly to let him know that you are not afraid.  Sit and watch TV or something and do this for an hour or more every day for a few weeks.  At first it may resist, but be persistent and make it endure until it actually likes it and soon it will be falling asleep in your hands, feeling completely safe in your hands.  It is easier to do this in the day time when they are not as active.  Carrying your Sugar in a bonding pouch is also good, and will certainly speed up the process.  Giving treats is also a great way to convince your Sugar that you are its friend.  If you initially are giving it treats while bonding with it… he will learn that hanging out with you is rewarding, and he’ll love you for it!  Gliders know you primarily by scent and sound.  So carry him around with you all day long.. rub him with your hands as much as possible.. and give him treats. 

With persistence, patience, and lots of love, your new Sugar will come to trust you in time.  The bonding process doesn’t usually take a long time, however, each Sugar is different.  It may only take a day or two for your Sugar to develop a trusting nature toward you, or it may take several weeks.  My first Sugar crabbed and me and bit me for NINE MONTHS before he finally decided to trust me.  After all that patience and persistence with him, he and I are still great friends.  Don’t give up or lose interest, because this is the most important time of your Sugar Glider experience, and you’ll be able to watch your bond grow stronger and stronger with every passing month!

One other word of caution.  While you are new to your Glider, it will often be defensive when you   . 

Introduction Methods

There are five introduction methods you can try in the following suggested order:

1. Two-Handed Introduction
2. Tent Introduction
3. Supervised "Sleepy Pouch" Introduction
4. Scent-Swapping
5. Scent Masking

1. Two-Handed Introduction. Try putting one glider in one hand and one glider in the other so you can hold on to them and comfort them. It is a good idea to wear gloves while doing this even if you know both gliders and they are both (separately) bonded to you. It is a good idea to have a neutral (non scented) fleece in each hand so they can snuggle into the fleece if they get frightened during the introduction. Slowly bring your hands closer together while keeping a gentle grip on each glider through the fleeces. Observe closely what the reaction is between the gliders. If they don't start fighting right away, you can slowly cup your hands together and allow them to interact while you are holding them.  If that works with no fighting, you can put them down on a fleece and see if they get along. But be ready to pull them apart.

2. Tent Introduction. You may also introduce them in a tent and initially bring them together with the two-handed introduction. This is effective with two gliders. Any more and it might be too hard to handle them all if they start fighting. I say this assuming you will be in the tent with them. If you are in the tent with them you can easily separate them if there is a fight. If you don't use a tent, you can try a bathroom. Put fleece on the counters.

3. Supervised "Sleepy Pouch" Introduction. You can also try the "Sleepy Pouch" method. Here, you get a clean, large (Ventilated) pouch that has enough room in it to put your hand between the two gliders. It is recommended you do this in the morning when they are sleepy. Wrap a small (clean) fleece around each suggie. Put one in one corner of the pouch and then put your hand in. Then put the other one in on the other corner of the pouch. Here, their scents will slowly intermingle while they are sleeping so when they wake up, the scent of the other glider is not a shock. You may withdraw your hand from time to time, but keep yourself ready to put it in there if they stir and begin to awake. As they awake, you can spred your fingers apart and allow them to see each other and smell each other through your fingers. This takes a long time, so do it when you have time - not right before you have to go to work or run errands.
 
4. Scent Swapping. You can try a "slow introduction" method which involves the swapping of bedding, pouches and cages. This is towards the end of the list because we have found that if a glider does not like the scent of another glider that does not abate with constant introduction of the strange glider's smell. But it has been known to work on some gliders. The procedure is simple. First, you take a fleece square that has been well-scented by the other glider and put that fleece square in the nesting box or pouch of the other glider. Keep doing this for about a week.

Next, you can progress to swapping their pouch or nesting box. Do that back and forth for about a week.
 
Last, you can simply swap them back and forth between cages - pouches, fleeces, toys and all. For about a week.

The idea is to get their scents combined and get them used to each others smell.

Once these steps have been done, you can introduce them in a neutral setting using one of the previous methods. If that is successful, outfit them in a newly cleaned, neutral cage and see if they get along.

5. Scent Masking. By attempting to neutralize their scent with masking agents such as (non-alcoholic) vanilla extract, or even tuna juice (as is done with rat introductions), their scent reaction is minimized. Using a scent masker puts them both on a level playing field so they smell like each other instead of something "not like." It is best to do this after the glider has peed and otherwise eliminated so there is no extra urine or fecal matter about to come out. Here, you can use a damp cloth to gently wipe their fur and nether regions to wipe away extra residual scent. Now, you can use the scent masking agent with a dab on their back, neck and cloaca area. Be careful not to use any cleaning agents, alcohol-based material or anything caustic that could possibly hurt the glider. A dab of canned tuna juice, which is food, is not going to hurt them. Ditto a natural vanilla extract that has no alcohol. You can get non-alcoholic vanilla extract at Trader Joes. It is called Trader Joe's Cookbook Vanilla.

We recommend the scent masking if the above methods fail. You can then use scent masking as a combination with one of the other methods.

 Top Twenty Introduction Tips

Here are 20 related tips dealing with introductions you should remember:

1. Quarantine first. It's also good idea to take all animals to the vet for a check-up (two weeks after you get them so the incubation period for certain parasites have passed). And be prepared to take them to a vet in a hurry if/when they start biting each other and they cause open wounds.

2. Make sure the females are NOT pregnant. Introductions, especially failed ones, may trigger enough stress for her to destroy her babies. Talk to your vet about the quarantine period.

3. "Pick on someone your own size." The new ones must be the same size as the existing alpha male. They have to be able to defend themselves long enough for you to separate them. If you throw someone else's babies in there, your established gliders could kill them in a snap.

4. Males should be neutered before introductions if they are old enough (4.5 months) and give them a few weeks to recover and normalize. It's easier to do "strange" introductions with neutered males. The less testosterone - the better.

5. When sugar gliders attack and fight, they do so blindly and fearlessly. They will roll up into a ball and bite anything they can get their teeth on. During introductions, wear gloves.

6. If you get bit deeply on the finger, an injection of bacteria into the tendon sheath can land you in the hospital. If you get bitten deeply, wash the area, use hydrogen peroxide to clean the wound and make an appointment with your doctor to see if you need a course of antibiotics.

7. The introduction "environment" must be an open, glider-safe neutral space OUTSIDE OF THE CAGE. Do NOT just plop gliders in the same cage to see what happens. You must be able to maneuver in and amongst them and you cannot have a tiny door as an obstacle. A bathroom is perfect for this purpose and inside the shower stall (door closed) or in the bathtub (drain closed) is a perfect space.

8. Give them something to snuggle in together but not a tight space like a pouch. Instead you can use handfuls of fleece because it is easier to pull them apart if they start to fight that way.

9. It only takes a few minutes to figure out if there is going to be aggression between gliders no matter what method you use. If they don't get along, you can REVERT to scent-swapping.

10. Have enough room in your heart to take them as pets separately if the union fails. This means if you only have one glider and you are about to go out and acquire another one, you should prepare yourself for the distinct possibility that the union will fail. Can you handle two cages? And two separate play times? If you cannot, we do not recommend running out and getting that second glider and then end up surrendering it to a rescue if the introduction fails. Think it all the way through.

11. Introducing females to an adult male is a lot easier than introducing another male, neutered or not. Even adult males and females will fight each other when introduced, but he is less likely to fight with a female then a male.

12. Males can get along, but you'd do very well to neuter them first. This is a warning. If the established male is neutered it is better. It takes only 4 to 5 months for established males to assert their sense of territory as they grow up. Neutered ones will also fight, but the less testosterone the better.

13. Sleepy Introduction Warning. It's easier to introduce someone new if they are sleeping or sleepy. You can put them in a pouch and have your hand at the ready. They will wake up smelling a combination of their own scent and the scent of the "other." However, you must now let them play out in the open and get a load of each other while they are wide awake. Do not assume they are OK with each other just because they slept in the same spot. This is a warning.

14. Keep food away at first. Some gliders are really territorial about their food - especially around strangers. Wait long enough for them to show you they are getting along before food is introduced. Food can be a lightning rod for aggressive behavior. It is ok to delay feeding them until after it looks like they are getting along. Anywhere between 6-8 hours of delay is not going to hurt your gliders. You can also feed them ahead of the introduction so they have some food in them before you try.

15. If a female is in estrous, it's better to delay introductions. You'll know if she is because the male(s) will be trying to mount her and bother her, neutered or not. And if she keeps chasing him or them away in the standard ritual, that's not a time when introducing strange gliders is a good idea.

16. You should have a spare, neutral cage ready. This means if you have one glider in one cage, and another in a second cage, you must neutralize the scent in one of the cages so when you are ready to join them, the dominant scent of one glider is not pervasive. Use a steam cleaner, scrub brush, vinegar and soap mixture, etc. and scrub that cage down! Double-wash all of the toys, fleeces, pouches, nesting boxes, etc. throughout the cage.

17. It is OK if hissing and crabbing and a little lunging goes on, just listen for "screaming" which is like a high-pitched sound on top of frantic crabbing. That's real fighting. If they break each others' skin you must watch them closely because if it gets infected, that may trigger self mutilation.

18. If your gliders wound each other and leave open, bleeding punctures, get them to your vet. If you are diligent you can pull them away from each other hopefully before any real damage is done.

19. Scrapes and cuts have a tendency to be over-groomed which can lead to self-mutilation, so you should have an e-collar on hand in case it is needed before you go to the vet.

20. It is important to understand that you must prepare for separating two (or more) fighting sugar gliders and that the separation must happen immediately, and without hesitation. That's why you need to have gloves on. If you are the type of person that upsets easily and will faint or go weak-kneed at the sight of fighting, you better get someone in the room who can deal with breaking up a fight. If you cannot handle this or cannot get someone to help you who can handle it, your lack of preparation could spell death for one or more animals.

G. Motivation for Introductions and Warnings

If you are motivated to join cages of gliders together because it is more convenient for you to have one cage, we would argue that is not a sufficiently strong reason to do introductions. In fact, it could be dangerous for your sugar gliders. Introductions are especially risky if you are joining two groups of gliders. Larger colonies in general are not a good idea. It is not often that a colony over six in size ends up very happy. One glider will usually be ejected, chased to the bottom of the cage, picked on, or killed. Large colonies do not exist in the wild. Matriarchs of colonies usually chase away the smaller females when they become adult. In our experience, large colonies are the result of inbreeding and there are often casualties, maiming and death associated with those. For this reason, it is not recommended that you join groups of gliders for a resulting large colony.

Our motivation at Lucky Glider Rescue & Sanctuary in introducing gliders is to improve the quality of their collective lives. This especially makes sense if you have lone gliders that are over-grooming from the stress of being along or even biting themselves because of stress.
Gliders are colony animals and generally have a better quality of life if they are with another glider. We regard these circumstances of lone gliders who are displaying stress-related behaviors as "at-risk" gliders.

Over-grooming can escalate easily into self-mutilation (SM) where a glider will bite at its tail or cloaca and sometimes even bite off its tail or a digit or even disembowel itself. Although some of these SM behaviors can be triggered by malnourishment, urinary tract infection, or a digit being stuck on an object -- in many cases it comes down to the stress of being alone. We have seen over-grooming and full-on SM behaviors completely abate after joining lone gliders.
 
Some gliders can lead healthy lives as loners, but many cannot. It is for these at-risk gliders that we recommend the introduction methods listed here. There are more extreme methods such as wetting we have tried twice, but these have not been fully proven and will require more input from veterinarians and other experts before being fully condoned. At this time, the methods listed here are the ones we fully endorse, without reservation. Again, we recommend showing this paper to your vet and getting advice on which method may be right for you.

Introduction Methods-There are five introduction methods you can try in the following suggested order:

1. Two-Handed Introduction
2. Tent Introduction
3. Supervised "Sleepy Pouch" Introduction
4. Scent-Swapping
5. Scent Masking

1. Two-Handed Introduction. Try putting one glider in one hand and one glider in the other so you can hold on to them and comfort them. It is a good idea to wear gloves while doing this even if you know both gliders and they are both (separately) bonded to you. It is a good idea to have a neutral (non scented) fleece in each hand so they can snuggle into the fleece if they get frightened during the introduction. Slowly bring your hands closer together while keeping a gentle grip on each glider through the fleeces. Observe closely what the reaction is between the gliders. If they don't start fighting right away, you can slowly cup your hands together and allow them to interact while you are holding them.  If that works with no fighting, you can put them down on a fleece and see if they get along. But be ready to pull them apart.

2. Tent Introduction. You may also introduce them in a tent and initially bring them together with the two-handed introduction. This is effective with two gliders. Any more and it might be too hard to handle them all if they start fighting. I say this assuming you will be in the tent with them. If you are in the tent with them you can easily separate them if there is a fight. If you don't use a tent, you can try a bathroom. Put fleece on the counters.

3. Supervised "Sleepy Pouch" Introduction. You can also try the "Sleepy Pouch" method. Here, you get a clean, large (Ventilated) pouch that has enough room in it to put your hand between the two gliders. It is recommended you do this in the morning when they are sleepy. Wrap a small (clean) fleece around each suggie. Put one in one corner of the pouch and then put your hand in. Then put the other one in on the other corner of the pouch. Here, their scents will slowly intermingle while they are sleeping so when they wake up, the scent of the other glider is not a shock. You may withdraw your hand from time to time, but keep yourself ready to put it in there if they stir and begin to awake. As they awake, you can spred your fingers apart and allow them to see each other and smell each other through your fingers. This takes a long time, so do it when you have time - not right before you have to go to work or run errands.
 
4. Scent Swapping. You can try a "slow introduction" method which involves the swapping of bedding, pouches and cages. This is towards the end of the list because we have found that if a glider does not like the scent of another glider that does not abate with constant introduction of the strange glider's smell. But it has been known to work on some gliders. The procedure is simple. First, you take a fleece square that has been well-scented by the other glider and put that fleece square in the nesting box or pouch of the other glider. Keep doing this for about a week.

Next, you can progress to swapping their pouch or nesting box. Do that back and forth for about a week.
 
Last, you can simply swap them back and forth between cages - pouches, fleeces, toys and all. For about a week.

The idea is to get their scents combined and get them used to each others smell.

Once these steps have been done, you can introduce them in a neutral setting using one of the previous methods. If that is successful, outfit them in a newly cleaned, neutral cage and see if they get along.

5. Scent Masking. By attempting to neutralize their scent with masking agents such as (non-alcoholic) vanilla extract, or even tuna juice (as is done with rat introductions), their scent reaction is minimized. Using a scent masker puts them both on a level playing field so they smell like each other instead of something "not like." It is best to do this after the glider has peed and otherwise eliminated so there is no extra urine or fecal matter about to come out. Here, you can use a damp cloth to gently wipe their fur and nether regions to wipe away extra residual scent. Now, you can use the scent masking agent with a dab on their back, neck and cloaca area. Be careful not to use any cleaning agents, alcohol-based material or anything caustic that could possibly hurt the glider. A dab of canned tuna juice, which is food, is not going to hurt them. Ditto a natural vanilla extract that has no alcohol. You can get non-alcoholic vanilla extract at Trader Joes. It is called Trader Joe's Cookbook Vanilla.

We recommend the scent masking if the above methods fail. You can then use scent masking as a combination with one of the other methods.

Top Twenty Introduction Tips-Here are 20 related tips dealing with introductions you should remember:

1. Quarantine first. It's also good idea to take all animals to the vet for a check-up (two weeks after you get them so the incubation period for certain parasites have passed). And be prepared to take them to a vet in a hurry if/when they start biting each other and they cause open wounds.

2. Make sure the females are NOT pregnant. Introductions, especially failed ones, may trigger enough stress for her to destroy her babies. Talk to your vet about the quarantine period.

3. "Pick on someone your own size." The new ones must be the same size as the existing alpha male. They have to be able to defend themselves long enough for you to separate them. If you throw someone else's babies in there, your established gliders could kill them in a snap.

4. Males should be neutered before introductions if they are old enough (4.5 months) and give them a few weeks to recover and normalize. It's easier to do "strange" introductions with neutered males. The less testosterone - the better.

5. When sugar gliders attack and fight, they do so blindly and fearlessly. They will roll up into a ball and bite anything they can get their teeth on. During introductions, wear gloves.

6. If you get bit deeply on the finger, an injection of bacteria into the tendon sheath can land you in the hospital. If you get bitten deeply, wash the area, use hydrogen peroxide to clean the wound and make an appointment with your doctor to see if you need a course of antibiotics.

7. The introduction "environment" must be an open, glider-safe neutral space OUTSIDE OF THE CAGE. Do NOT just plop gliders in the same cage to see what happens. You must be able to maneuver in and amongst them and you cannot have a tiny door as an obstacle. A bathroom is perfect for this purpose and inside the shower stall (door closed) or in the bathtub (drain closed) is a perfect space.

8. Give them something to snuggle in together but not a tight space like a pouch. Instead you can use handfuls of fleece because it is easier to pull them apart if they start to fight that way.

9. It only takes a few minutes to figure out if there is going to be aggression between gliders no matter what method you use. If they don't get along, you can REVERT to scent-swapping.

10. Have enough room in your heart to take them as pets separately if the union fails. This means if you only have one glider and you are about to go out and acquire another one, you should prepare yourself for the distinct possibility that the union will fail. Can you handle two cages? And two separate play times? If you cannot, we do not recommend running out and getting that second glider and then end up surrendering it to a rescue if the introduction fails. Think it all the way through.

11. Introducing females to an adult male is a lot easier than introducing another male, neutered or not. Even adult males and females will fight each other when introduced, but he is less likely to fight with a female then a male.

12. Males can get along, but you'd do very well to neuter them first. This is a warning. If the established male is neutered it is better. It takes only 4 to 5 months for established males to assert their sense of territory as they grow up. Neutered ones will also fight, but the less testosterone the better.

13. Sleepy Introduction Warning. It's easier to introduce someone new if they are sleeping or sleepy. You can put them in a pouch and have your hand at the ready. They will wake up smelling a combination of their own scent and the scent of the "other." However, you must now let them play out in the open and get a load of each other while they are wide awake. Do not assume they are OK with each other just because they slept in the same spot. This is a warning.

14. Keep food away at first. Some gliders are really territorial about their food - especially around strangers. Wait long enough for them to show you they are getting along before food is introduced. Food can be a lightning rod for aggressive behavior. It is ok to delay feeding them until after it looks like they are getting along. Anywhere between 6-8 hours of delay is not going to hurt your gliders. You can also feed them ahead of the introduction so they have some food in them before you try.

15. If a female is in estrous, it's better to delay introductions. You'll know if she is because the male(s) will be trying to mount her and bother her, neutered or not. And if she keeps chasing him or them away in the standard ritual, that's not a time when introducing strange gliders is a good idea.

16. You should have a spare, neutral cage ready. This means if you have one glider in one cage, and another in a second cage, you must neutralize the scent in one of the cages so when you are ready to join them, the dominant scent of one glider is not pervasive. Use a steam cleaner, scrub brush, vinegar and soap mixture, etc. and scrub that cage down! Double-wash all of the toys, fleeces, pouches, nesting boxes, etc. throughout the cage.

17. It is OK if hissing and crabbing and a little lunging goes on, just listen for "screaming" which is like a high-pitched sound on top of frantic crabbing. That's real fighting. If they break each others' skin you must watch them closely because if it gets infected, that may trigger self mutilation.

18. If your gliders wound each other and leave open, bleeding punctures, get them to your vet. If you are diligent you can pull them away from each other hopefully before any real damage is done.

19. Scrapes and cuts have a tendency to be over-groomed which can lead to self-mutilation, so you should have an e-collar on hand in case it is needed before you go to the vet.

20. It is important to understand that you must prepare for separating two (or more) fighting sugar gliders and that the separation must happen immediately, and without hesitation. That's why you need to have gloves on. If you are the type of person that upsets easily and will faint or go weak-kneed at the sight of fighting, you better get someone in the room who can deal with breaking up a fight. If you cannot handle this or cannot get someone to help you who can handle it, your lack of preparation could spell death for one or more animals.

G. Motivation for Introductions and Warnings

If you are motivated to join cages of gliders together because it is more convenient for you to have one cage, we would argue that is not a sufficiently strong reason to do introductions. In fact, it could be dangerous for your sugar gliders. Introductions are especially risky if you are joining two groups of gliders. Larger colonies in general are not a good idea. It is not often that a colony over six in size ends up very happy. One glider will usually be ejected, chased to the bottom of the cage, picked on, or killed. Large colonies do not exist in the wild. Matriarchs of colonies usually chase away the smaller females when they become adult. In our experience, large colonies are the result of inbreeding and there are often casualties, maiming and death associated with those. For this reason, it is not recommended that you join groups of gliders for a resulting large colony.

Our motivation at Lucky Glider Rescue & Sanctuary in introducing gliders is to improve the quality of their collective lives. This especially makes sense if you have lone gliders that are over-grooming from the stress of being along or even biting themselves because of stress.
Gliders are colony animals and generally have a better quality of life if they are with another glider. We regard these circumstances of lone gliders who are displaying stress-related behaviors as "at-risk" gliders.

Over-grooming can escalate easily into self-mutilation (SM) where a glider will bite at its tail or cloaca and sometimes even bite off its tail or a digit or even disembowel itself. Although some of these SM behaviors can be triggered by malnourishment, urinary tract infection, or a digit being stuck on an object -- in many cases it comes down to the stress of being alone. We have seen over-grooming and full-on SM behaviors completely abate after joining lone gliders.
 
Some gliders can lead healthy lives as loners, but many cannot. It is for these at-risk gliders that we recommend the introduction methods listed here. There are more extreme methods such as wetting we have tried twice, but these have not been fully proven and will require more input from veterinarians and other experts before being fully condoned. At this time, the methods listed here are the ones we fully endorse, without reservation. Again, we recommend showing this paper to your vet and getting advice on which method may be right for you.

Beautiful female sugar glider for sale- She is a Platinum mosaic, amazing coloring, sweet but a little shy. She needs a wonderful new family to love and take care of her, contact me if interested

Our babies (White Face Blonde, Leucistic,and Mosaic Sugar Gliders) are spoiled  are handled Daily . We also on occasion have rescues available for Adoption.      

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New Store - Outbackgliderstore.com ,     We have Several fun items,    
Sugar glider Stuffed animals    
Sugar glider soft sided Travel cages  
Unique Sugar glider Cage Labels
Sugar Glider Polo embroidered Shirts
Sugar Glider Toys 
Unique Sugar glider zippered bonding Pouches   


Our Bonding Pouches is made of Cotton/polyester exterior shells and warm Soft fleece interiors , the very best fabric for a sugar glider pouch, and 100% machine washable. Why do you need a Bonding Pouch?  the bags serves to provide a safe and secure area inside the cage to sleep. 
The Bonding Pouch is for carrying your glider around outside the cage in safety, which speeds up the bonding process. The sugar glider pouches hang from a high quality silk rope that has been permanently stitched, with double reinforcements, to ensure protection. A safety peek-a-boo window lets your sugar glider see out, you can see in, and the glider gets excellent ventilation - a much safer approach than using a "drawstring" pouch.  This window is made of pet-safe screen in resilient black vinyl-coated polyester that is resistant to tears and scratches. These sugar glider pouches have been glider-tested in our quality assurance lab to ensure safety and quality.  They are spacious and there is plenty of room for multiple sugar gliders - just the right size for bonding

 A Couple  very important safety features you will not find in many other pouch products:
  * Inside seams and side loops have been double sewn to prevent exposure to loose threads, which can wrap around limbs and cause severe injury.
 *Sugar glider The corners are "boxed" to prevent the pouch from collapsing inward and crowding the sugar glider space, creating plenty of safety-first sleeping room.
 *Sugar glider quality information to guide you in the care and raising of your pet Sugar gliders. Take the time to read through this important information, preferably before you purchase a pet Sugar Glider. Articles on Sugar glider food, Sugar glider cages, and suggested Veterinarians are listed, along with breeding information and purchasing guides. Being informed on the care and breeding of Sugar gliders will benefit both you, and your new pets. It will also help you avoid health issues with your Sugar Gliders in the future. 
  * The pouch closes with a safe double sewn plastic zipper right above the plastic screen window to prevent the glider from crawling or jumping out.  Unlike the "open top" pouches, just a quick zip and your glider is safe and very secure - plus you don't have to be constantly worried about the glider jumping out of the pouch.

This Fun pouch includes a removable tail- See store for the pouches that are currently available.

Sugar Glider Bonding Pouch It can be used as both a bonding and a sleeping pouch when your sugar glider is new to your home, giving your glider a feeling of trust and security from the beginning.  Just hang the pouch open in the cage.  Remove pouch, close, and wear around your neck to start the bonding process.  The pouch hangs over your heart so your glider can hear your heart beat.  This feature is important and soothing to sugar gliders as they are used to hearing their mother's heart beat.

Sugar Glider Bonding Pouch  Consider getting two of these well made products so you always have a clean one ready on pouch laundry day.  Professionally sewn with pride and love in the U.S.A.

The Outback glider store ONLY Offers Zipper Closures On Our Pouches Due To The Fact Of Keep Your Gliders In The Safest Possible Way When You Are Out In Public Or Beginning To Carrying Your New Joeys For The Bonding Process.


Zippers Offer The Safest Possible Haven While Velcro, Button Or Tie Closures   Can Be Nosed Open By Sugar Gliders Of Any Age And They Can Quietly Climb Out And Become Lost Thus Creating Heartbreak And A Lost Beloved Pet.
Sugar Glider Bonding Pouch Our Pouches Have Room For 1-4 Adult Sugar Gliders.
So Be Sure To Consider The Safest Possible Closure Method When Choosing Your Suggie Needs.

Sugar Glider Bonding Pouch Each Bonding Pouch Is Made Of Polar Fleece, The Best, Safest And Prefered Fabric Of Sugar Gliders. Bonding Pouches Are Designed Specifically For Bonding Time With Your Sugar Gliders. A Zipper Closure To Keep Your Suggie Safe And Secure.Each Pouch Has The Gliding Room Exclusively Designed Fully Lined Peek-A-Boo Window The Peek-A-Boo Window Serves As A Vision Protector In Bright Light For Nocturnal eyes, Ventilation For Fresh Air, And For The Curious Glider That Just Wants To See What is Going On.

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